The State of Childhood Obesity

The federal government has several sources that track obesity rates among children and teens, including the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey and three major studies that track national trends and rates within some states. Data from each of these sources is available below. This site also summarizes policies and programs that aim to help children achieve a healthy weight during early childhood, in school and in the broader community.

Use the Select a State option above to view key childhood obesity indicators at the state level.

New Data
October 2017
The national childhood obesity rate is 18.5 percent. The rate varies among different age groups and rises as children get older: 13.9 percent of 2- to 5-year-olds, 18.4 percent of 6- to 11-year-olds, and 20.6 percent of 12- to 19-year-olds are obese. There also are striking racial and ethnic disparities, 25.8 percent of Hispanic children and 22 percent of Black children are obese. Learn more from the latest surveys and trends.
Childhood Obesity Trends
New Data
September 2017
The 2016 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) found combined overweight and obesity rates for children and teens ages 10 to 17 ranged from a low of 19.2 percent in Utah to a high of 37.7 percent in Tennessee.
Study of Children Ages 10 to 17 (2016)
Interactive
November 2016
Obesity rates declined in 31 states and three territories, increased in four states, and remained stable in the rest from 2010 to 2014 among 2- to 4-year-olds enrolled in WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children). Rates exceeded 15 percent in 18 states and ranged from a low of 8.2 percent in Utah and a high of 20.0 percent in Virginia to in 2014.
Obesity Among WIC Participants Ages 2-4, 2000-2014
Interactive
August 2016
High school students are drinking less soda, according to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The most recent data reveal that among U.S. high school students, 20.4 percent drank soda at least once a day in 2015, down from 27.0 percent in 2013, and 27.8 in 2011.
High Soda Consumption
Interactive
August 2016
High school students are spending more recreational time on computers, watching less television, and struggling to get enough physical activity, according to the most recent Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The 2015 data reveal that among U.S. high school students, 41.7 percent used a computer three or more hours a day for fun outside of school work, up from 41.3 percent in 2013, and 31.1 percent in 2011.
High Computer Usage
Interactive
June 2016
According to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), 13.9 percent of high school students were obese, and an additional 16.0 percent were overweight. State obesity rates among high school students ranged from a low of 10.3 percent in Montana to a high of 18.9 percent in Mississippi, with a median of 13.3 percent.
High School Obesity Rates
Updated
August 2016
More than 15 million U.S. children live in "food-insecure" households — having limited access to adequate food and nutrition due to cost, proximity and/or other resources.
Food Insecure Children
Updated
August 2016
Nearly one in four (23.4 percent) women are obese before becoming pregnant — which can increase the risk for a wide range of health complications for the baby and the mother. More than 6 percent (approximately one in 16) of pregnant women have or develop diabetes during pregnancy — known as gestational diabetes.
Percent of women obese prepregnancy
September 2015
Around 3.5 percent of U.S. children and teens (ages 2 to 19) are underweight. Combining underweight (3.5 percent) and obese (17 percent) children — 20.5 percent of children have increased health risks due to being an unhealthy weight.
Underweight Children